Metal. Monsters. Mayhem.

"The powerful play goes on, and you will contribute a 'verse." — Walt Whitman, by way of Joss Whedon

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Last chance before the lights go out

Hey everyone — just a short note to remind my faithful blog followers and web visitors that all the action is now at the new version of As You Were. Soon I’ll be turning out the lights here for good.

What have you been missing? Well, in addition to all the full posts and comments from this embryonic version of As You Were, there are new stories in Werewolf Wednesday and Thunder God Thursday. There are also regular new reviews on Metal Monday and Feature Friday. Besides all that, this summer I joined a cadre of other bloggers to look at the works of J.R.R. Tolkien in Puttin’ the Blog in Balrog. Plus, the new site is [humility mode off] organized better, has some new features and looks nicer.

So click on over! If you like what you see, please take a second to follow the new blog. I can’t import blog followers from the old version of my site, but fortunately you can easily subscribe to the new one. I’ve put the “Follow this Blog” widget right up near the top. If you’ve been with me this far I’d love to have you along for the ride as we head into winter — I’ll be posting regularly and don’t want you to miss anything.

Thanks again for following and/or stopping by!  It’s been great to have you and I hope to see you at the new site.

Cheers,

David

We are moving! We are moving!

… to a new location.  Starting on May 23 (that’s a week tomorrow), As You Were will be at the following URL: http://www.davidjonfuller.com.  All the posts, comments and  other great stuff are already there;  but this post will be the last new thing you see at this address before the lights go out.

But don’t worry — there will be some great new posts springing to life at the new, official site, including a feature interview with Catherine Lundoff on her new werewolf novel Silver Moon, a couple of new blog tours, book reviews and more.

So to those of you who follow this blog, have it bookmarked, or just stop by: please point your browsers to the new site.

Thunder God Thursday: Thor hits the funnybooks

Artist Oliver Coipel revamped Thor’s look for Marvel Comic’s reboot of the series, written by J. Michael Straczynski, in 2007.

Author’s note: a few things have changed since this was written, namely the resurrection of Thor by Marvel Comics in the acclaimed run on the new title by J. Michael Straczynski, alluded to in the comments from Tom Brevoort below. Also, there were new incarnations of Norse myths in independent comics, such as Grant Gould’s The Wolves of Odin.

And one other thing, what was that?  Oh yeah, a blockbuster movie based on Marvel Comics’ Thor, starring Chris Hemsworth as the titular thunder god, who returns to the big screen as the big guy in The Avengers.  If you want to see how the god of thunder went from medieval god to modern superman, read on…

The Modern Edda: Norse myths in comics

Though their names leap out at us from the days of the week, Norse gods were relatively obscure until recently. Opera figures of Siegfried and Brunnhild were one tentative step into this pagan world, but it took another form of entertainment to plunge a new generation into the old myths: comic books.

To read more, click here.

Authors put the bite on vampires and their ways

We’ve all heard enough about vampires recently.

Everyone knows they look like frumpy old ladies, overjoyed that an aging population means they fit in nowadays. Or that they keep humans penned up as food, and having sex with a human is tantamount to bestiality. Or that when a vampire slayer starts killing them off, they go right to the police.

Wait, this isn’t sounding too much like Twilight or True Blood — but they’re some of the ideas introduced in the new Canadian anthology Evolve, edited by Nancy Kilpatrick.

The Montreal-based Kilpatrick is no stranger to the genre, having written numerous dark fantasy and horror novels herself. She previously edited the erotic vampire collection Love Bites, and co-edited Edge’s horror anthology Tesseracts 13.

Tesseracts 13 was the first horror title published by Edge, a predominantly sci-fi and fantasy publisher in Calgary. The success of that book prompted this new all-vampire anthology.

To read more, click here.

She did it — now she needs to hang on

Well, many of us predicted it: Rachel Deering managed to get to $20,000 in pledges for her Kickstarter campaign to fund the remaining five issues of her “lesbian werewolf epic,” Anathema.  A huge and hearty congratulations to her.

Now comes the hard part.  I don’t mean the writing, lettering and publishing, which Rachel will undertake (though the publishing duties have now been picked up by Comix Tribe — a huge coup for Rachel).  No, the challenge now is to ensure the total stays above that mark until the campaign closes on April 30. If any pledges are reduced, bringing the total below $20,000, none of the money is collected.

That’s already happened once — for a very understandable reason. One prospective donor who had pledged $1,000 reduced it to $45 upon learning he would soon have a baby to support. Great news for the donor, on which Rachel and other pledgers offered congratulations; but a snag in the fundraising all the same.

To read more, click here.

Werewolf Wednesday: Underworld

Underworld (2003 film)

I had no idea when I first wrote about Underworld during a stint as movie reviewer for Uptown Magazine that the movie would spawn a four-movie franchise, the latest of which, Underworld: Awakening, hit theatres in March this year.

I’m afraid I never got past the sequel.  This first instalment had its moments (few and far between) but the second, despite Derek Jacobi doing his best Hunt For Red October riff as a sub captain hunting paranormals (if you’re saying “huh?” I say: exactly), was a hot mess.  And that’s kind of unfair to words denoting temperature and chaos.

To read more, click here.

If you think comic books are expensive, try publishing one

Creating your own comic book series can be an all-or-nothing endeavour. Just ask Rachel Deering, the woman behind Anathema.
Telling the story of Mercy Barlowe, a woman whose lover, Sarah, is burnt at the stake for being a lesbian, the first issue shows us how Mercy seeks out supernatural help to rescue Sarah’s soul from a sinister cult. (You can read the As You Were interview with Rachel on her career and her own experience with homophobia here.)

To read more, click here.

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